Remembering Anthony Bourdain

A big reason I started The Saboscrivner is because of local celebrity Ricky Ly, founder of http://www.tastychomps.com, published author, and one of the biggest food writers in Orlando.  Ricky and I both used to be regular, prolific posters on the Florida forum on Chowhound.com, but when he founded the Orlando Foodie Forum on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/groups/orlandofoodieforum/), I followed him there and became a part of that incredible community.  I have not yet had the opportunity to meet Ricky in real life, but he has definitely been an influence on me.  I feel more connected to Orlando because of him, and I’ve learned a lot about our rich restaurant scene and food in general thanks to him.  Through his Facebook group, I’ve received a lot of encouragement about my writing, inspiring me to finally create this blog, which I should have done a long time ago.

However, maybe the biggest reason I got into this food blogging game was Anthony Bourdain.  His death last month hit me much harder than any other celebrity deaths I can think of, because I was such a huge fan of his.  Through his TV shows, his food writing, and even his novels and graphic novels, I felt like I knew the guy, and I thought the world of him.  He really inspired me to think more about the food I ate, where it came from, who made it, and the stories and culture behind it all.  He was a saboscrivner too — when you listened to his voice or read his words, you were along for the ride with this very cool, but very tortured, tour guide.  The sights, the smells, the tastes — he made them real.  You were there.  That’s what I hope to do, on a much smaller scale.

When I learned of Bourdain’s suicide almost one month ago, I wrote what I hoped was a worthy tribute on Facebook, and Ricky included my piece among other local culinary luminaries on his food blog, Tasty Chomps.  I was honored to be included among well-known chefs and much better-known food writers.  So here’s his compilation of eulogies from several different writers, including me:

http://tastychomps.com/2018/07/in-memoriam-orlando-remembers-anthony-bourdain.html

Just in time for July 4th, let’s talk about favorite groceries.

Here’s some food for thought (heh) for Independence Day, when some of us may be off work and possibly cooking with our families and friends.  Have fun, stay hydrated, and definitely stay safe, whether you’re grilling over an open flame or blowing stuff up.

I write a lot about restaurants, but I don’t eat out all the time, I assure you.  I do love grocery shopping, though.  I go to multiple supermarkets to find the best deals and best things to eat.  It’s the only kind of shopping I enjoy.

But I gots to know: What groceries do YOU strongly recommend? What do you buy that you love, that’s better than anything else? What have you discovered recently that you don’t know how you lived without? And where do you find it?

Some examples:

Hot dogs: I grew up in a Hebrew National household, then I became a Sabrett loyalist when I moved out and started shopping and cooking for myself, but the Boar’s Head all-beef hot dogs that come clumped and tightly shrink-wrapped together in a package of seven are even better. Similar garlicky flavor, but these have the perfect snap of a natural casing. I only buy hot dogs once or twice a year, but now I always go for these.  I might have to get some today!

Mustard: BaTampte for a good everyday deli mustard (easily available at Publix), and Beaver jalapeno mustard for something delicious that’s hotter (but is unfortunately much harder to find locally). I was surprised by how good the Grey Poupon Deli Mustard and Mild and Creamy Mustard were, last time Publix had a BOGO deal, since I’m not big on regular dijon. I’d definitely get more of those.*

*I have every intention of writing more about mustard, since I love it so much.  Expect a new recurring feature on this blog called Cutting the Mustard.  You heard it here first, faithful foodie followers!

Knishes: Pickles Deli in Longwood used to be the only place I could get a good potato knish in the area. They serve Gabila’s knishes, which are the best — made in New York, of course, but became rare a few years ago after a factory fire. Yes, there was a nationwide knish shortage! Well, I’ve found them in the frozen case at Publix now, and I highly recommend them, whether you’re a knish maven or some kind of n00b. Make sure you have some good mustard on hand for them!

Macaroni and potato salads: I’ve tried them all, I’ve made them with all kinds of different recipes, but I always go back to Publix for my favorite versions. The New York and Southern potato salads are both excellent.

Pasta sauce: After growing up with nasty Ragu as a kid and begging my mom to switch to Prego like my friends’ moms, I made my own for many years — first from doctoring a jar of Prego with a can of tomato paste and all kinds of other ingredients, and now by using canned San Marzano tomatoes and making it from scratch. But if I’m in a hurry, nothing beats Rao’s Arrabbiata sauce. It’s a little pricey, but you can occasionally find sales at Fresh Market or Target, and it is perfect in every way. I’ve been to many Italian restaurants whose red sauces aren’t nearly as good as Rao’s.

Hot sauce: Minorcan Mayhem datil pepper sauce. They have it on the tables at 4 Rivers Smokehouse, so you can try it there before buying it, and of course they sell the bottles. So tasty, with a lot of flavor rather than pure ass-kicking heat (which I hate). There’s even a subtle sweetness. I highly recommend it.
https://www.minorcanmayhem.com/

Whisps: these tiny, crispy crackers are made of 100% parmesan cheese, so they’re a life-changer if you’re on a low-carb diet but are craving salty, crunchy snacks and don’t feel like pork rinds. (The story of my life for the last year and a half.) I’ve seen tiny bags at Publix, or you can stock up on a larger bag at Costco for about $10. They are awesome.

Salami: Aldi is my new favorite supermarket, and they sell pre-sliced dry salami in regular (similar to genoa) and spicy (similar to pepperoni) varieties, at $5.99 per pound. They are great. The slices aren’t paper-thin, so they have a nice chewiness, and the spicy one is delicious. I always keep it on hand for snacks, along with Aldi’s sliced provolone cheese, which is usually $1.89 for an eight-ounce package with 12 slices.

By the way, If you haven’t been to Aldi, check it out. Bring a quarter for a shopping cart and bring your own bags, but you’ll find so much high-quality food that’s often the same stuff you could buy anywhere else, for a fraction of the price. I’m a convert. And they get new, random, often fascinating stuff all the time — I got a really rad record player that transforms into a briefcase there two weeks ago — so it’s worth making regular visits to see what they have.

What do the rest of you recommend?

Bosphorous

On Sunday evening, I met a friend at Bosphorous, the beautiful Turkish restaurant on Park Avenue in Winter Park.  (https://www.bosphorousrestaurant.com/)  It is one of my favorite restaurants in Orlando, and it never disappoints.  This time was no exception.

My friend had never been there before; I suggested it because she is vegetarian, and other vegetarian friends I’ve brought there thought they died and went to heaven, with all the delicious options to choose from.

We shared the mixed appetizer platter with puffy lavas bread, which is almost a requirement when you eat there.  The soft, pita-like bread will arrive at your table puffed up with hot air, and you need to pierce it with fork tines to deflate it to avoid being burned.  Then rip off pieces and go to town with the cool, refreshing dips in the platter.  I have said that everything tastes better in sandwich or dip form, and these dips are among the finest around.  The platter also comes with one of Bosphorous’ stuffed grape leaves, sliced in two, and a few kalamata olives and cornichons (tiny pickles, which I love, even though I’m normally not big on pickles).  You have to order the lavas bread separately, but you’ll regret it if you don’t!

One of my favorites is the savory tomato and sauteed eggplant dip called soslu patlican.  I could eat a whole jar of that stuff in no time.  I should really learn how to make it myself!  The platter also includes babaganoush (smoked eggplant dip), tabbuli (similar to couscous), ezme (a spicy salsa-like dip with tomatoes, onions, jalapenos and other peppers, and walnuts), and haydari (a thick, creamy yogurt dip with walnuts).

My absolute favorite, which my wife loves too, is taramosalata, which is a creamy, salty, fish roe concoction.  Unfortunately, it wasn’t included this time, replaced with a thin, creamy dip called cacik, with yogurt, cucumber, mint, and dill.   (My brilliant brother, one of my most loyal readers, suggested cacik might be etymologically related to the similar Greek yogurt sauce tzatziki, and he’s probably right!)  I guess without the taramosalata, the whole platter is vegetarian, so that makes some sense.  It doesn’t even seem to be on the menu anymore!

If you don’t want to spring for the whole platter, you can always order any of these dips separately, but for first-time diners, I strongly recommend trying them all, so you can pick out the ones you like best.  My least-favorite is the hummus, because it’s just plain hummus, which I eat all the time.  I wonder if they let you mix and match.  It never occurred to me to ask!

While my wife and I usually share the mixed appetizer platter and an order of doner kebap (similar to gyro meat, and served on a bed of rich and buttery rice pilaf, perfect for wrapping up in the lavas bread), this time I tried something new to me: the lahmacun, which is like Turkish pizza — flatbreads that were at once both crispy and soft, covered with ground lamb in a piquant sauce.  It comes accompanied by shredded, pickled red cabbage, beets, and red onions (love it!), plus some mixed greens and sliced tomatoes.  You put the vegetables on the lahmacun half-moons, pour on a little of the incredible vinaigrette dressing, fold it, and eat it like a sandwich.  I loved it.

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My friend ordered the spinach and feta pide, a pastry “boat” that was warm and soft, stuffed with sauteed spinach and melty, cheesy goodness, topped with sliced tomatoes.  She was suitably impressed.

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Unfortunately, my wife was down for the count with a migraine to end all migraines, which is the only reason she didn’t join us for dinner.  But I ordered another mixed appetizer platter and a whole lavas bread to bring home to her, which she appreciated.  (Except they forgot the stuffed grape leaves on this one — First World Problems Alert!)  This is one of the ways you make a marriage work, you guys.

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Ring the Alarm! Blue Jacket Grille

Occasionally you’ll see posts titled “Ring the Alarm!,” so you’ll know onion ring reviews are coming.  I love onion rings, and I’m always on a quest for good ones.  Sadly, there are a lot of mediocre-to-bad onion rings out there.  Yesterday, I had some of the best around.

***

Yesterday I had a working lunch with two of my co-workers and our supervisor.  We went to the nautical- and Navy-themed Blue Jacket Grille (https://bluejacketgrille.com/), moments from work.  It’s so great to have this relatively new restaurant close at hand.  This was my fourth visit in about six months, and the food has yet to disappoint.

I almost always order a burger there, and not just any burger, but the Pimento Cheese burger, which comes with a fried green tomato slice, and of course, what Mike Ehrmantraut referred to as the “caviar of the South” on Better Call Saul: pimento cheese.  I became obsessed with pimento cheese after trying it on one of the best burgers of my life at the Stock and Barrel in Knoxville, Tennessee, back in 2013.  Orlando has some mighty fine pimento purveyors, including Blue Jacket Grille, The Coop, Se7enbites, and Swine and Sons.  I make my own now, too.  Just like chili, meatloaf, and salsa, everyone’s version is different, but it’s hard to go wrong.

Also, this burger comes on marble rye, but I always request it on a soft brioche bun instead.  They cook it medium rare, as most tasty burgers should be cooked, and automatically serve it with lettuce, tomato, onion, and pickle, as most tasty burgers should be served.

bluejacketgrille

And of course, because I love onion rings enough to make Ring the Alarm! a regular feature on The Saboscrivner, I got onion rings as my side with the burger.  The choice was a no-brainer; these are some of the best onion rings in town.  Golden-fried, beer-battered, not overly greasy, not too thick or too thin, the onion doesn’t come whipping out of the breading to whack you in the face — they’re perfect in every way.  Definitely in the top five best onion rings in town.  I had already turned one of my co-workers onto these rings, and I was pleased to note that she and our supervisor split an order of their own.

Blue Jacket Grille is in the former location of the Smiling Bison (now in Sanford), and Redlight, Redlight (now in Audubon Park) before that, on Bennett just north of Colonial.  It’s a nice little neighborhood place, with everything you’d expect to find on a sports bar or family restaurant menu, just done better than most.  I’d rather eat here than the Ale House, Chili’s, or most other restaurants of that style any day.  They also have really terrific beer cheese, which comes with lightly-toasted pretzel slices, and if you want tots, they will bring you a HUGE basket of tots.  There are TVs all over the walls, mostly tuned to sports, if you can’t eat without that.  They have trivia nights on Tuesdays and karaoke nights some other night, which I have every intention of making it to some day.  I love both, but nobody else I know does.  Cue the sad trombone for me!

Buttermilk Bakery

This morning, my wife wanted croissants, and I agreed they sounded good.  But we couldn’t get ourselves out of bed at a reasonable time to go out, and I was plagued by nightmares about vacationing with friends to an unfamiliar beach that turned out to be a dystopian hellscape, with crumbling, graffiti-strewn hotels and roving gangs of punks straight out of an ’80s movie, daring vacationers to pass their flaming barricades and swinging chains to catch a glimpse of the ocean.  But enough about my inner turmoil!

By the time I got up and dressed, I figured most bakeries would be slammed by the brunch crowd, so I went off to bring home croissants from Buttermilk Bakery, a newish Winter Park bakery we’ve only been to once before, but I never reviewed.  (http://www.buttermilk-bakery.com/)

I was lucky to find the last parking space in the back, since they were doing bang-up business, with every table full and a line almost out the door.  But once I got up front, I was greeted by friendly bakers and a dazzling array of croissants and other pastries:

buttermilk_1

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Since we rarely make it out there, I ended up bringing home two plain croissants (although there is nothing “plain” about them), a morning bun, a monkey bread croissant, and a cinnamon sugar brioche doughnut.  They definitely made my wife’s morning, especially after I brewed up some cafe con leche for her.  After dreaming of seaside terrors and a fight for survival amid Art Deco ruins, the flaky, buttery, rich croissant and vaguely floral-accented morning bun helped me find my center as well.

buttermilk_takeout

We are so lucky to have access to a plethora of awe-inspiring bakeries here in Orlando.  At this point, I don’t even mess with anything from the Publix bakery.  We have so many better local options, for the rare times I indulge in sweets.  (My wife is the one with the sweet tooth!)  We’re the hugest fans of Se7enbites, especially for pie, and we’ve had great experiences at Benjamin French Bakery and now Buttermilk Bakery for croissants.  Heartsong Cookies and Gideon’s Bakehouse both make some of the best cookies I’ve ever had, and The Gourmet Muffin specializes in… well, you can guess.  These are all baked goods — no baked bads among them!

My First and Only Professional Food Writing Gig (so far…)

For years, I’ve been a regular poster on the Orlando Foodie Forum on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/groups/orlandofoodieforum/), which is a pretty great community.  That led to me being invited to contribute a piece to the Orlando Weekly at the end of last year, listing my five favorite local dishes of 2017.  Getting published as a real, professional food writer was one of the proudest moments of my life, and I still stand by this list of local favorites.

https://www.orlandoweekly.com/orlando/orlandos-best-new-dishes-of-2017/Content?oid=9614809

Bravo Supermarket

Anyone who knows me knows I’m a big fan of grocery stores and grocery shopping.  It’s the only kind of shopping I enjoy, in fact.  I regularly stop at multiple stores to pick things up: Aldi (my favorite), Publix, Costco, occasionally Trader Joe’s, Fresh Market, and Target if I’m near them.

We recently had a Bravo Supermarket open near us, which is aimed at the Latinx community and specializes in groceries and prepared foods from Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean.  (https://www.bravosupermarkets.com/)

The prices are fantastic, and as you would expect, they carry all kinds of stuff Publix doesn’t.  I got my wife an assortment of coconut waters, since they have over a dozen different brands and varieties: some with pulp and some without pulp, some roasted, some “young” coconut, etc.

The hot foods counter is set up like a cafeteria line, where you can get a styrofoam box stuffed to bursting with the rice of your choice (white, yellow with pigeon peas, or a specialty rice) with an entree and a side, for $7 and change.  I’ve been twice so far.  Last week, I brought home roast pork over yellow rice with tostones (crispy-fried plantains) for my wife and stewed goat over fried rice with maduros (sweet plantains) for myself.  Today being a Friday, I remembered they had rabo (oxtail) as a special of the day, and I always love oxtail.  I got mine over moros rice (white rice stewed with black beans and onions) with maduros.

bravo_oxtails

It was really good oxtail, but nothing beats when I get it at the Jamaican restaurant Golden Krust, one of my favorites.  I’ll have to go back soon and review it.

The prepared foods counter also has quesitos, empanadas, pastellitos, Jamaican beef patties, some desserts, and they will make you Cuban coffee, too.  Their quesitos (pastries stuffed with sweetened cream cheese) are very tasty, but much doughier and chewier than I’m used to.  The quesitos from the Cuban restaurants back home in Miami were usually made of a flakier, crispier, almost croissant-like dough that often shattered when you bit into them.  Both are good, though.